Butterfly Release

Butterfly Release

Butterfly Release

A butterfly release can be a beautiful addition to your wedding, memorial service, or for a special occasion, like a birthday, engagement, baby shower, anniversary, graduation or Quinceanera. Butterfly releases are also a great way to bring attention to a charity to raise money or launch a new product or business.

A butterfly release is a unique way to celebrate your special day with the beautiful symbolism of a butterfly release. A live butterfly release can be added as part of your celebration in one of two ways: a mass release or an individual release.

A mass release is when one person or a couple would release the butterflies from one box. For an individual release, guests are provided an envelope containing one butterfly. It is instinctive and natural for the butterflies to fly when the envelope or box is opened. At a pre-determined moment, all guests would open their envelope allowing the butterfly to fly free. Both ways result in the same filling the sky with beautiful and colorful live butterflies.

Butterfly Release for Funerals

Butterfly Release for Funerals

Be careful to ensure that your butterfly release is held outdoors, during the day and when the temperature is above 70 degrees. If it is too cold, the butterflies will not fly. Also, be sure to hold your release in an area protected from the wind or either the butterflies will not fly or they will quickly disappear. A sunny, warm, flower-filled area or garden is best.

One hour before you want your butterflies to fly, you should let the butterflies warm and wake up. Once the butterflies are released, they will fly to nearby flowers and plants.

Butterfly Release for Weddings

Butterfly Release for Weddings

The butterflies’ first flight is usually very short, and they will instinctively fly toward the brightest object — people wearing bright colors — or towards flowers and bouquets.

Ideally, you should plan to let them fly free no later than two hours before sunset. This will allow sufficient time for them to find nectar to eat and to find a safe hiding place for the night. The butterflies will perpetuate naturally and instinctively repopulating their dwindling numbers in our environment.